Eckington anti-fracking march organisers hail event a success

Organisers say today's anti-fracking march was a success
Organisers say today's anti-fracking march was a success
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Organisers of today's anti-fracking march in Eckington are adamant they made a difference in the fight to keep shale gas drilling away from their patch.

Organisers of today's anti-fracking march in Eckington are adamant they made a difference in the fight to keep shale gas drilling away from their patch.

Significantly higher numbers than expected turned out at Eckington for the march to the Butchers Arms pub. Along the way, they chanted a slogan which is becoming common in the area: no fracking way.

It's aimed at oil and chemical company Ineos, who is looking at exploring shale gas reserves in the area.

Some marched from Mosborough before meeting up with the group for the final leg of the journey.

The women behind the march - Mosborough's Sarah Vause and Eckington resident Sarah Marsh - hoped 200 people would march alongside them. They lost count at the 350 mark.

The two Sarahs say awareness is the key, and they achieved that.

"We got some media attention, and hopefully some good media attention," Sarah Vause, 39, said.

"Everybody's got a right to their opinion, and we had the right to stage a peaceful protest today."

She now wants people to start "doing their homework in regards to fracking and some of the health and environmental implications it can have.

"At the end of the day, you can't preach to people," she said.

The women were also pleased that everyone stayed safe during the march. Plenty of work went in to making sure that happened, with meetings with Derbyshire Police.

"To be honest, I didn't know what we were letting ourselves in for," Mrs Vause said.

Mrs Marsh, 46, said the hard work paid off, and the issue was well and truly on the radar in the area.

"We thought it would make a difference," she said.

"We've heard of other areas where other companies have pulled out because of public protests."

The women say they are ordinary people who care about their townships.

"We are just concerned mums really," Mrs Marsh said.

Mrs Vause agreed.

"I feel so strongly for my kids, my health and my house," she said.

"It's had quite a big impact on my life."