Doncaster boffins call for Government health warning on porn at town conference for sex addicts

Should there be a limit on watching pornography?

Should there be a limit on watching pornography?

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Doncaster boffins are to call for a government health warning limiting the time people can spend watching porn at a sex addiction conference in the town later this year.

The Foundation for Counselling and Relationship Studies, based at University Centre Doncaster, warns that there should be a limit on the time people spend viewing internet pornography - over fears it could be damaging their relationships.

The foundation will run three study days on sexual addiction based around the growing problem, which its says can lead to severe relationship issues.

More than three-quarters of men and a third of women view porn at least once a week, mostly on mobile devices - often at work - with the average age of first use being only 11 years old.

Ironically, sex addicts often don’t have very much partnered sex, as it becomes increasingly less interesting, the more porn use takes hold, with many developing difficulty getting erections or climaxing.

Spokesman and psychosexual therapist Cate Campbell said: "Counsellors and therapists need to be able to recognise warning signs and to have an idea of the help that’s available.

"Moodiness, having to stay late at work due to missing deadlines, going off sex and even just coming to bed at a different time from their partner may result from porn dependency…and, like any addict, compulsive porn users can be very secretive and defensive – sometimes making partners feel as though they are going mad."

The three study days cost £95 each and will cover:

* Understanding Internet Addiction (July 29)

* Treating Sexual Compulsion and Addiction (September 23)

* Supporting the Partners of Sex Addicts (October 21)

Watching internet porn for as little as five hours a week can be risky, and it is possible to become addicted by 11 hours of use because excitement and risk combined with repetitive searching and clicking can physically alter the brain, producing an effect similar to cocaine addiction .

"People associate sexual addiction either with glamorous stars who simply enjoy a lot of sex or with sleazy perverts," added Ms Campbell.

"However, most of those affected are highly respectable and the problem just creeps up on them.

"Sexual compulsion isn’t necessarily about having a lot of sexual partners. Often, it starts with someone using porn occasionally to help them relax, and develops into them needing to use porn more and more just to feel normal."

All three days will take place at the Foundation for Counselling and Relationship Studies,based at University Centre Doncaster, High Melton.

For more information, or to book a place on the course contact Michele Logue on 01302 553818 or email Michele.logue@don.ac.uk

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