Detectives believe key to solving murder lies in Rotherham community

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Detectives spent a day following up leads and looking for people with fresh information to help them identify the killer of a Rotherham pensioner.

They returned to Maltby on the day the murder of 80-year-old Tommy Ward featured on the BBC's Crimewatch programme, hoping to find people who have not yet come forward with information which could help crack the case.

Mr Ward was brutally attacked in his home in Salisbury Road on Thursday, October 1 last year.

The former soldier, who suffered a fractured skull, broken ribs and shattered jaw, died in a nursing home on Tuesday, February 23.

He was so badly injured he was never able to tell South Yorkshire Police what happened to him, but his £30,000 life savings were stolen.

Five people arrested in connection with the incident have been released.

The charity Crimestoppers is offering a £10,000 reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the killer.

Detective Chief Inspector Vicky Short said it was an 'horrific attack' and she believes the key to cracking the case lies in the Maltby community.

"Someone knows something in that community," she said.

"Tommy was badly assaulted and bled - did someone come home with blood on them?

"£30,000 was stolen - where has that money gone? It is a significant amount of money. Has a neighbour or someone you know bought a car or something else out of the ordinary? It's that kind of thing we need to know about because the answer to this lies in the Maltby community."

DCI Short said the attack on Mr Ward had devastated his family.

"He was very close to his family and they are all absolutely devastated at the loss of such an important person in their lives. They want answers and we want justice for them and for Tommy.

"This was a vile and unnecessary attack on a vulnerable old man and I would urge anyone who knows anything to come forward

Anyone with information on the attack should call South Yorkshire Police on 101 or Crimestoppers on 0800 555111.