Dawson is just awesome

(back l-r) Fiona Connell, 15, Jessica Carroll, 15, Elisa Cocking, 15, and Emily Tindle, 15, all of St Pius X school, have delivered the Rotherham torch to Our Lady & St Joseph School, with (front l-r) Thomas Drury, six, Dawson Lambert, seven and Robyn Hartley, nine holding thier flames up, as they are celebrating the Olympic torch coming to the UK. Picture: Andrew Roe
(back l-r) Fiona Connell, 15, Jessica Carroll, 15, Elisa Cocking, 15, and Emily Tindle, 15, all of St Pius X school, have delivered the Rotherham torch to Our Lady & St Joseph School, with (front l-r) Thomas Drury, six, Dawson Lambert, seven and Robyn Hartley, nine holding thier flames up, as they are celebrating the Olympic torch coming to the UK. Picture: Andrew Roe
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A boy who struggled to walk until he underwent surgery is raising funds for the Sheffield hospital where he had treatment.

Dawson Lambert could not sit up properly until he was two-and-a-half years old and was three before he could take a few steps.

But Dawson’s life was changed in a series of operations at Sheffield Children’s Hospital.

Now aged nine, Dawson, from Wath-upon-Dearne, Rotherham, has walked 10 miles to raise funds for The Children’s Hospital Charity.

He has been nicknamed Awesome Dawson by the members of the church he attends and has raised £600 to date.

Dawson said: “Walking is something people don’t really think about, but for me it’s a life-changing experience. I really wanted to say thank you, so raising money for the people who helped me so much is important to me.

“Every penny I make can help other people and go towards finding the next cure and improving someone else’s life.”

He completed his walk at Manvers Lake with his mother Cat. They walked around the lake eight times armed with collection buckets.

Cat said: “It was a wonderful day, the sun was shining and everyone was really generous. As we were walking people would stop their car and put money in our collection tin. It really helped Dawson to push through to the finish line.”

The funds will go towards the charity’s Make it Better appeal which aims to transform the hospital with a new entrance, single bedrooms and ward space – built with children in mind.

Dawson first visited The Children’s Hospital in Sheffield in 2004, but despite numerous tests doctors have not been able to diagnose the genetic condition which causes him pain when undertaking small tasks like movement.

He has undergone a series of operations on his pelvis, feet and tendons, including having a shard of bone taken from either side of his hip and used to reconstruct his feet in four places.

Dawson had surgery on both feet, meaning he was in a wheelchair for eight weeks post-surgery. The experience led him to vow never to be in a wheelchair again.

Sheffield Children’s Hospital director David Vernon-Edwards said: “We’re privileged to have brave young patients like Dawson. The money raised from his incredible achievement will help us to develop the hospital so we can help more brave children like him.”