Danube believe it? Third of Brits think Sheffield skyline is Budapest

Sheffield City from Norfolk Park which gives you a good view especially on a day like to today it was beautiful.'Keith Bown

Sheffield City from Norfolk Park which gives you a good view especially on a day like to today it was beautiful.'Keith Bown

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THE skyline of Sheffield is dominated by local landmarks such as the Town Hall, Hallamshire Hospital and the massive University Arts Tower, as well as lush greenery and the hills surrounding the city.

But according to a new survey, three-quarters of the British public were unable to recognise the landscape of the Steel City - with nearly a third of them confusing it with Budapest.

Don-ube: This is what Hungarian capital Budapest's skyline really looks like.

Don-ube: This is what Hungarian capital Budapest's skyline really looks like.

The Hungarian capital lies beside the iconic River Danube, and its skyline boasts an impressive panorama including the historic parliament building and the Chain Bridge which crosses the water.

Yet 32 per cent of people polled thought a photo of Sheffield’s skyline was Budapest.

The test, carried out by hotel chain Travelodge, quizzed 5,000 British adults to see whether they could identify the skyline of Britain’s largest cities, as well as some of the world’s most-visited cities.

Further mix-ups included mistaking Leeds for Brussels, York for Bruges and Manchester for Madrid, while others thought Newcastle was Sydney and Birmingham was Frankfurt.

Sheffielders: Meadfoot Beach, Torquay - not Italy and not Spain either.

Sheffielders: Meadfoot Beach, Torquay - not Italy and not Spain either.

A fifth of Britons struggled to identify London, with one in 10 believing the capital’s skyline was New York City.

The results were better when participants were faced with well-known international skylines.

Just under 90 per cent correctly recognised San Francisco, and 93 per cent identified Paris, with eight out of 10 recognising Rome.

Shakila Ahmed, from Travelodge, said it was ‘shocking’ that people had difficulty recognising cities in their home country.

“This report has highlighted that Britons need to reacquaint themselves with some of the UK’s great cities. Skylines serve as a kind of fingerprint of a city and no two skylines are alike,” she said.

“It’s shocking that more people could easily recognise international city skylines but they struggled to identify the skylines of cities that lie on their own doorstep.”

n Meanwhile another poll by Butlins showed Sheffielders had their own difficulties when it came to recognising landmark UK views. When shown a series of pictures of the British coastline, 77 per cent of respondents from Sheffield thought a photo of Torquay was Italy, Spain or Eastern Europe.

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