South Yorkshire Police hit the road to catch drink drivers

Two members of staff from Yorkshire Ambulance Service NHS Trust - Pete Cownley and Richard Mitchell - have received awards from the Royal Society for the Protection of Life from Fire after putting their own lives in danger to save others from a burning vehicle. ''Left to right: Chief Inspector Stuart Walne, Emergency Medical Technician Richard Mitchell, Paramedic Pete Cownley and Chief Superintendent Keith Lumley.
Two members of staff from Yorkshire Ambulance Service NHS Trust - Pete Cownley and Richard Mitchell - have received awards from the Royal Society for the Protection of Life from Fire after putting their own lives in danger to save others from a burning vehicle. ''Left to right: Chief Inspector Stuart Walne, Emergency Medical Technician Richard Mitchell, Paramedic Pete Cownley and Chief Superintendent Keith Lumley.
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Roadside checks and random breath testing form part of South Yorkshire Police’s crackdown on drink driving this summer.

Officers are stepping up efforts to catch offenders in the act as warmer weather leads to an increase in barbecues, parties and daytime drinking.

The force’s latest campaign aims to drive home the message that getting behind the wheel while over the limit can cost a lot more than your driving licence.

Figures show 156 people under the age of 25 were killed or seriously injured as a result of drink driving in the UK in 2010.

Motorists will be stopped and checked at various times during the day at a number of different locations across South Yorkshire.

Chf Insp Stuart Walne, who leads SYP’s Roads Policing Group, said: “Drink driving presents a risk at any time of year, on lighter evenings and as we move into the school holidays there are more pedestrians and cyclists on the streets.

“These are some of the most vulnerable road users and South Yorkshire Police would urge the small number of people who would consider driving when unfit through drink or drugs to think again.

“Officers will be out in marked and unmarked cars following up on information provided and focusing on areas where the risk is greatest.”

Drivers under 25 are being targeted in the crackdown, as those aged between 20 and 24 failed more breath tests than any other age group in 2011.