Sheffield muslims condemn gun attack in Paris

People gather for a vigil Wednesday, Jan. 7, 2014 in Seattle after a shooting at the French satirical publication Charlie Hebdo left 12 people dead. Gunmen stormed into the Paris office, killing employees of the publication that were gathered for a meeting. Islamic extremists claimed responsibility for the attack.
People gather for a vigil Wednesday, Jan. 7, 2014 in Seattle after a shooting at the French satirical publication Charlie Hebdo left 12 people dead. Gunmen stormed into the Paris office, killing employees of the publication that were gathered for a meeting. Islamic extremists claimed responsibility for the attack.
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Sheffield muslims have condemned a gun attack on the offices of the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo which left 12 dead.

Masked gunmen men burst into the offices in Paris shouting ‘Allahu Akbar’ - God is greatest - as they opened fire, killing a number of the publication’s staff and two police officers.

A chilling video later captured them climbing out of their black car and jogging towards a police officer as he lay injured on the floor, and gunning him down before fleeing.

Eight journalists, two police officers, a maintenance worker and a visitor were killed.

Another 11 people were wounded, four seriously.

The gunmen are said to have headed straight for the magazine’s editor Stephane Charbonnier, killing him and his police bodyguard first.

They then turned their guns on cartoonists Georges Wolinski and Berbard Verlhac.

Also killed were Bernard Maris, an economist who was a contributor to the newspaper, and another policeman.

Dr Nadeem Ahmad, President of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community Sheffield, said: “We condemn the attack on Charlie Hebdo and are deeply shocked by this atrocity that has taken 12 lives and injured more.

“We offer our condolences to the families of the victims and those left bereaved.

“It is hoped that the perpetrators of the attack are swiftly arrested and brought to justice with the full weight of the law.

“It is a great source of regret that such violent acts and terrorist activities continue to be associated with Islam - despite the fact they have nothing to do with Islam’s true teachings.”

Police hunting those behind the massacre have made ‘several arrests’, French Prime Minister Manuel Valls said.

Photographs of two prime suspects - brothers Said Kouachi and Cherif Kouachi - have been released by police.

The French nationals are both in their 30s and have possible links to al Qaida.

A third suspect, Hamyd Mourad, 18, has handed himself in.

The French PM said preventing another attack was the country’s ‘main concern’.

Charlie Hebdo, a weekly satirical magazine, had been threatened before for its caricatures of the Prophet Muhammed.

The terror attack has been condemned by global leaders and France’s president Francois Hollande has declared a national day of mourning today following the raid.

France has raised its terror alert system to the maximum - Attack Alert - and bolstered security with more than 800 extra soldiers to guard media offices, places of worship and other possible targets.

In the UK, Home Secretary Theresa May will chair a meeting of the Government’s emergency committee Cobra today.

Prime Minister David Cameron has offered the assistance of British spies to help French agencies investigate the atrocity.