Disaster interviews begin into Hillsborough

File photo dated 15/04/1989 of Liverpool fans trying to escape severe overcrowding during the FA Cup semi-final football match between Liverpool and Nottingham Forest at Hillsborough. A new police investigation into the Hillsborough disaster was announced by the Home Secretary today. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Wednesday December 19, 2012. 96 Liverpool supporters died at Sheffield Wednesday's Hillsborough stadium on April 15 1989, where their team were to meet Nottingham Forest in an FA Cup semi-final. See PA story POLICE Hillsborough. Photo credit should read: David Giles/PA Wire

File photo dated 15/04/1989 of Liverpool fans trying to escape severe overcrowding during the FA Cup semi-final football match between Liverpool and Nottingham Forest at Hillsborough. A new police investigation into the Hillsborough disaster was announced by the Home Secretary today. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Wednesday December 19, 2012. 96 Liverpool supporters died at Sheffield Wednesday's Hillsborough stadium on April 15 1989, where their team were to meet Nottingham Forest in an FA Cup semi-final. See PA story POLICE Hillsborough. Photo credit should read: David Giles/PA Wire

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Witness interviews have begun as one of the investigations under way into the Hillsborough disaster gathers pace.

The Independent Police Complaints Commission, which is examining the actions of police officers in the aftermath of the disaster, is looking for evidence of possible police misconduct.

It comes after an independent panel found evidence statements had been altered to shift blame for the tragedy away from South Yorkshire Police and on to football fans.

A total of 96 Liverpool fans died after too many supporters were let on to the terraces at Sheffield Wednesday’s ground in April 1989 during an FA cup semi-final.

New inquests into the deaths have been ordered after the original ‘accidental death’ verdicts were quashed following the panel’s report.

The IPCC is working alongside the coroner due to oversee the inquests, Lord Justice Goldring.

IPCC deputy chairman Deborah Glass said: “We have been working with him and his team to identify the key investigative areas that he would like us to focus on.

“We expect these to be around the issues of amended statements and the allegations of police officers putting pressure on witnesses.

“We have reviewed and revised our investigation plan as a result and this should ensure there is no delay to the inquest process.”

The IPCC has a team of 55 staff involved in the investigation, with additional posts still to be filled.

A second probe into the disaster – ordered by Home Secretary Theresa May – is also under way.

The investigation, led by former Durham Chief Constable Jon Stoddart, will look at what happened in the lead-up to and on the day of the disaster to establish where any culpability lies.

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