Crime rates fall across Derbyshire

A Generic Photo of a burglar breaking into a house. See PA Feature HOMES Homes Column. Picture credit should read: PA Photo/thinkstockphotos. WARNING: This picture must only be used to accompany PA Feature HOMES Homes Column.
A Generic Photo of a burglar breaking into a house. See PA Feature HOMES Homes Column. Picture credit should read: PA Photo/thinkstockphotos. WARNING: This picture must only be used to accompany PA Feature HOMES Homes Column.
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Crime has fallen across Derbyshire – with the county seeing almost 800 fewer victims of offences over the past year.

Derbyshire Constabulary has announced in the year ending Wednesday, April 1, overall crime in the county fell by 1.5 per cent, with 51,687 incidents reported over the previous 12 months, compared to 52,479 the year before.

Derbyshire Chief Constable Mick Creedon. Photo contributed.

Derbyshire Chief Constable Mick Creedon. Photo contributed.

Chief Constable Mick Creedon said: “There were almost 800 fewer victims of crime in Derbyshire over the past year, which is great news.”

However, police chiefs warned the figures do not reflect the full range of offending, including complex cases such as child abuse and sexual exploitation.

Over the last year, house burglaries fell by 6.6 per cent, from 2,906 to 2,714, while robbery fell by more than 18 per cent, from 629 offences to 515.

Shoplifting rose by 6.9 per cent, from 5,778 to 6,176 crimes and, last year, represented 12 per cent of all crimes reported to the force.

Violence crimes have risen by 9.3 per cent from 9,177 to 10,033, which the force claims is reflecting a national trend. A total of 3,939 of these were for ‘violence without injury’, including stalking and making threats.

Mr Creedon said: “Although shoplifting has increased again, this is the first year the trend has begun to slow and I encourage shops to work with us to try to prevent this offending.

“I’m pleased to see a rise in the number of people reporting sexual offences and domestic violence, and many of the sexual offences we are told about happened months and even years ago – again I encourage victims to have the confidence to speak out and not suffer in silence.

“These crimes have historically been underreported and it’s encouraging to see that victims feel confident in coming forward.”

He said although the reduction in crimes is pleasing, they do not represent the full range of offending.

He said: “These figures are defined by a national standard, which is not our standard.

“They properly reflect low -level criminal damage and theft of a tiny value, but don’t for example include a drunk driver, uninsured, speeding the wrong way down a one- way street outside a school talking on a mobile phone – committing numerous offences, but none of them are ‘recorded’ in the statistics.

“The figures don’t properly reflect the more complex offences, such as drug trafficking, slavery, child abuse and sexual exploitation.”