DCSIMG

Doncaster pupils earn their good report

Mallard Primary School headteacher Theresa Siverns with pupils after they received a goof Ofsted report. Picture: Andrew Roe

Mallard Primary School headteacher Theresa Siverns with pupils after they received a goof Ofsted report. Picture: Andrew Roe

Improved teaching at a Doncaster primary school has helped it achieve a ‘good’ mark in its latest Ofsted inspection.

The 400 pupils who attend Mallard Primary on Cedar Road, Balby, are said to achieve well in all subjects and reach the nationally expected standards by the end of Year 6.

The Ofsted team who visited in January reported that teaching has improved, with most of it good and on occasions outstanding.

Inspectors say this is due to the strong leadership of teaching and learning and the commitment of teaching and support staff to improving their practice.

Behaviour in classrooms and around the school is also described as good and has improved since the previous inspection in 2012. Pupils show respect and courtesy to adults and work well in groups together.

Lead inspector Fiona Gowers said: “Most pupils clearly enjoy learning. Indeed, in some classrooms pupils expressed some disappointment when a lesson came to an end because they were keen to carry on with their work!”

Pupils say they feel safe in school and that adults in school help them if they have any problems or worries.

Headteacher Theresa Siverns and governors have a clear understanding about how well the school is doing and senior leaders set high expectations and give the school clear direction for the future.

Mrs Siverns is described as being ‘passionate about improving the school and providing the very best for pupils’. She has successfully developed the leadership skills of both senior and middle leaders and fostered a strong team approach.

The continuous professional development of staff is given high priority and many members of staff are involved in additional training programmes of study, which directly benefit pupils. Teaching has improved and pupils are better behaved.

But Ms Gowers said Mallard ‘is not yet an outstanding school because some of the teaching is not good enough to help the most able pupils reach their full potential’ and their writing is ‘sometimes spoilt by poor grammar, punctuation and spelling’.

 

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