Confusing road markings in Crosspool spark crash fears - and petition

Motorists are being confused by the road markings on Sandygate Road, with one side of the road having enough room for a lorry and the other barely having enough room for a car. Picture: Andrew Roe
Motorists are being confused by the road markings on Sandygate Road, with one side of the road having enough room for a lorry and the other barely having enough room for a car. Picture: Andrew Roe
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A petition against confusing road markings which residents fear could cause an accident has been launched.

The markings on Sandygate Road, Crosspool, are off-centre and have divided it into a wider uphill lane and a narrow downhill line.

Sheffield Council says they are correct according to design and there is ‘no change in the available width of road’.

But residents fear the change will cause a crash.

Ian Hague, chairman of Crosspool Forum, said: “The concern is people are travelling down on the wrong side of the road. It looks like there is a parking bay all the way up the road and people are now parking on the pavement which is blocking access - it is a nightmare.

“There is going to be an accident there eventually.”

Phil Wainwright, of Sandygate Road, added: “I saw the road markings being laid and all they did was follow the divide where they had laid the asphalt - I believe they have made an error. To cover it up they want to put double yellow lines down which is going to cause all kinds of problems.”

The council said traffic tends to travel faster and take longer to stop in the downhill direction.

A spokesman added: “Providing more space in the uphill direction also allows better opportunities for overtaking slower cyclists - downhill the speed differential between a cyclist and other vehicles is much less. There is also evidence that when roads are resurfaced and in a good state of repair, speed increases and narrowing traffic lanes reduces speeds.

“The design also show yellow lining is due to be installed on parts of Sandygate Road. Finally, unusual or different layouts make motorists think and this tends to slow them down.”