Church leaves pile of soil on top of beloved Granddad's grave for over a week.

Tom's Granddad, Terry Atack
Tom's Granddad, Terry Atack
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Grieving relatives have been angered by the desecration of a family members graveside.

Terence Atack, from Warmsworth, died 18 months ago aged 74. He was buried at St John the Baptist church in Wadworth.

Tom Thorpe, kneeling by his Granddad's rubble covered grave.

Tom Thorpe, kneeling by his Granddad's rubble covered grave.

His wife, Mrs Beryl Atack, 74, of Coronation Gardens, was too upset to talk, but her Grandson Tom Thorpe, 24, has been incensed by the incident.

He said: "It was completely unnecessary, there was plenty of space either side of his grave. It's just stupid, and really upsetting for all of us, especially my Grandma."

The cemetery is run by the Church, who had dug a new grave next to Mr Atack's last Thursday ready for a burial a week a and half later on Monday 12 September.

"They dug up the soil and just put a big mound of it directly on top of my Granddad's grave and just left it like that" said Tom, of Coniston Drive, Balby.

He added: "A family member who lives near the church spoke to the vicar but the only response they got was that there was nothing they could do and that they would hold a ceremony after to re-bless my granddad's grave as its been interfered with. Which of course isn't something my family want to do only 18 months after the original funeral. They have said they would ring my Grandma personally on Wednesday but they haven't done so far."

Tom, who works as a Martial Arts Instructor, feels that there could be some potential legal action against those responsible.

He said: "I have a friend who is a solicitor and he told me about the the local authority cemeteries act."

He added: "Apparently you are not allowed to commit any nuisance or interfere with a grave, and I'm told this may come under that."

A spokesman for the church, Reverend, Alun Price, said: "“Sometimes it is necessary to place boards on an adjacent grave to store the soil while a new grave is dug. The adjacent burial has now taken place and the soil is back in the ground. It is the first time in my experience for anyone to pass comment on this normal procedure."