Chatsworth signs up for Sheffield University Chinese business boost

Trade Minister Lord Livingston (l) talks to post graduate student Jing Yun and University of Sheffield Deputy Vice Chancellor Paul White at the launch of business scheme to connect Chinese speaking students with local businesses wishing to export to China. Picture: Andrew Roe
Trade Minister Lord Livingston (l) talks to post graduate student Jing Yun and University of Sheffield Deputy Vice Chancellor Paul White at the launch of business scheme to connect Chinese speaking students with local businesses wishing to export to China. Picture: Andrew Roe
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Chinese students are to work with local firms in a new scheme which aims to attract more young people to Sheffield and boost business.

Chatsworth House in Derbyshire is one of the first businesses to sign up for the pilot scheme because of an increase in the numbers of Chinese tourists coming through its gates.

A spokesman for the stately home said: “Chatsworth is excited to be part of the pilot programme, and through partnership working with Sheffield University and its Chinese speaking students, we will be able to improve our welcome and programme of events and activities for the Chinese market, using their skills and experience and at the same time providing opportunities for the students to gain valuable skills for their future careers.

“Many Chinese students from Sheffield visit Chatsworth, and we are looking forward to working with them more closely.”

Post-graduate translator Jing Yun said the GREAT Ambassadors programme would ‘kill three birds with one stone’ by benefiting Sheffield University, students and businesses.

She said: “This can be a unique selling point to attract more Chinese students to study in British universities.

“It is a win-win situation.

“Business interactions between China and Britain are increasing rapidly.

“I believe it is important Sheffield maintains its relationship with China.”

The ambassadors project was launched this week and will place Chinese-speaking students with regional companies.

The students will help firms break into the Chinese market or find new investment and in return gain valuable work experience.

Trade minister Lord Livingston said the scheme would break down linguistic and cultural barriers.

China was chosen as the target market for the pilot because import demand is expected to top all other emerging powers.

China has more students in the UK than any other overseas country.