Boob trend fell flat

Dr. Maurice Mimoun, a plastic surgeon at the St Louis hospital, holds silicone gel breast implants made by French company Poly Implant Prothese, or PIP, that he removed from a patient because of concerns that they are unsafe, Paris, Wednesday, Dec. 21, 2011. French health authorities are considering whether to suggest that an estimated 30,000 women in France get their breast implants removed, amid warnings by leading doctors about risks of rupture and possible cancer risks. (AP Photo/Michel Euler)
Dr. Maurice Mimoun, a plastic surgeon at the St Louis hospital, holds silicone gel breast implants made by French company Poly Implant Prothese, or PIP, that he removed from a patient because of concerns that they are unsafe, Paris, Wednesday, Dec. 21, 2011. French health authorities are considering whether to suggest that an estimated 30,000 women in France get their breast implants removed, amid warnings by leading doctors about risks of rupture and possible cancer risks. (AP Photo/Michel Euler)
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I’m a 34B and so what?

I have never wanted a boob job and I have never understood why other women do.

Katie Price during a photocall to launch Katie: My Magazine at the Worx Studio in London. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Wednesday September 7, 2011. See PA story SHOWBIZ Price. Photo credit should read: Ian West/PA Wire

Katie Price during a photocall to launch Katie: My Magazine at the Worx Studio in London. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Wednesday September 7, 2011. See PA story SHOWBIZ Price. Photo credit should read: Ian West/PA Wire

Having your body cut open and going through the risks of a general anaesthetic for anything that isn’t vital to health makes absolutely no sense to me.

Nor does the thinking that having breasts that are unrealistically huge and as round as footballs makes you more attractive. In fact, I think it makes them look ridiculous.

But all that said, I don’t blame women for the craze. Or for the fact that 40,000 of them in Britain alone are currently staring down their surgically enhanced cleavages in terror in the midst of the breast implant scandal.

Not even Katie Price.

Back in her Jordan days, she was one of the first to prostrate herself under the knife in pursuit of the blow-up doll look.

She’d obviously had her pretty little head filled with the notion that the bigger her boobs got, the bigger her career and her fortune would be.

And whoever told her wasn’t wrong; on the back of those boobs, she floated to multi-millionairess status.

As she bobbed triumphantly along in a sea of adulation filled with as many women as men, the trend went ballistic. Thousands of women rushed for copyKatie boobs.

Breast augmentation is now the number one cosmetic surgery procedure. In 2010, almost 9,500 women got their boobs done in the UK. And probably many more went overseas in the quest for cheaper surgery.

Neither do I think that we should vilify the 40,000 British women currently living in dread that the implants they now know to be sub-standard might suddenly rupture inside them. Many are saying they brought it all upon themselves, either through vanity or a misguided a desire to boost their self-esteem.

They didn’t; they simply put their trust in the medical profession. And to a woman, they were taken advantage of.

Though I don’t only mean by the cosmetic hospitals and surgeons who opted to use the cheaper implants, or the company, PIP, who manufactured them.

It seems highly likely that all of those companies and individuals were acting out of greed. That the cheaper the material they stuffed into the chests of unwitting, comatose women who simply thought they were going to wake up with bigger boobs, the more money could be made from every op.

Those women, Katie Price included, were taken advantage of by the massive and hugely influential machine that is the sex industry.

It has made too many men think that the sexiest women look like porn stars. And it has made too many women believe it.

So where do we go from here? Will the government pay for surgery to replace the dodgy implants with safer ones and set up a national cosmetic surgery database listing who has had what and when?

Will women still want implants at all?

Logic would say not. But you just know thousands will not see it.