Bishop helps dedicate tree to World War One heroes

A special service to commemorate the Centenary of World War I. We will be joined by Bishop Steven for this service and will begin in the churchyard at 3pm with a dedication of an English Oak to those who served in World War I and are buried in our churchyard before continuing in church. Lord Mayor of Sheffield to attend.
A special service to commemorate the Centenary of World War I. We will be joined by Bishop Steven for this service and will begin in the churchyard at 3pm with a dedication of an English Oak to those who served in World War I and are buried in our churchyard before continuing in church. Lord Mayor of Sheffield to attend.
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An English oak tree has been dedicated to the soldiers who served in World War One at a Sheffield church.

The Right Reverend Dr Steven Croft, Bishop of Sheffield, and Coun Peter Rippon, Lord Mayor of Sheffield, took part in the special ceremony at All Saints Church in Ecclesall yesterday.

The service to mark the dedication of the tree, organised to mark the centenary of the outbreak of World War One, was also attended by David Moody, Lord Lieutenant of South Yorkshire.

The dedication was followed by a service in the church, with a collection taken to be shared between charities that provide support to armed service personnel.

There was a focus on the more cordial relationship between Britain and Germany at the service, which was attended by Mark Green, honorary consul from the German Embassy.

The service also included a video message from Sir Simon McDonald, the British Ambassador to Germany.

It was the second service of the day at the church, after a morning service to coincide with the national two-minute silence at 11am.

Other special church events that took place in the city this weekend included a display of the parish war memorial from the demolished St Andrew’s Church in Sharrow.

It was on show from Saturday at St Andrew’s Psalter Lane Church, along with details about the fallen men that had been researched by church readers Judith Roberts and Imogen Clout.

More than 100 men from the area featured on the memorial, with about a quarter of them being part of the Sheffield ‘Pals’ Battalion, who lost many soldiers at the Battle of the Somme.

Elsewhere, at the Dore and Totley United Reformed Church hall, there was an exhibition on Saturday and Sunday about local life during the war.