Ben winning the battle to walk again

Handout photo issued by LOCOG of Paratrooper, Lance Bombardier Ben Parkinson, 27, the most seriously wounded soldier to survive the war in Afghanistan, as he carries the Olympic Flame through his home town of Doncaster during  Day 39 of the London 2012 Olympic Torch Relay. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Tuesday June 26, 2012. See PA story OLYMPICS Torch. Photo credit should read: Gareth Fuller/LOCOG/PA Wire''The Torchbearer's name is provided in good faith, however the Press Association has been unable to verify it independently.
Handout photo issued by LOCOG of Paratrooper, Lance Bombardier Ben Parkinson, 27, the most seriously wounded soldier to survive the war in Afghanistan, as he carries the Olympic Flame through his home town of Doncaster during Day 39 of the London 2012 Olympic Torch Relay. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Tuesday June 26, 2012. See PA story OLYMPICS Torch. Photo credit should read: Gareth Fuller/LOCOG/PA Wire''The Torchbearer's name is provided in good faith, however the Press Association has been unable to verify it independently.
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WAR hero Ben Parkinson is taking another step forward on his road to recovery by undergoing intense physiotherapy to help him walk unaided with his set of new bionic legs.

The 27-year-old, from Doncaster, is the most seriously-injured soldier to survive the war in Afghanistan and is now winning his own battle to walk again.

He lost both legs and suffered brain and back injuries in a Taliban mine explosion in 2006, but is determined to walk again.

Lance Bombardier Parkinson is learning to use state-of-the-art £60,000 artificial legs, created for him by Rehab Prosthetics in Coalville, Leicestershire - the same firm that enabled Paralympic gold medallist Johnny Peacock to race to glory in the 2012 Games.

The computer-assisted legs, paid for by the Ministry of Defence, each contain a micro processor which senses movement and responds by bending the artificial knee, allowing Ben to walk.

He is undergoing physiotherapy and learning how to use the legs unaided with former Naval officer Robert Shepherd.

Mr Shepherd said: “You don’t say ‘no’ to Ben, you don’t say ‘can’t’.

“I struggle to keep up, I no longer make a plan of what to do in the day because he moves so quickly.

“The legs now are just wonderful.”

Ben, who spent three months unconscious after suffering his horrific injuries, said: “I don’t believe I’ll walk again, I know I’ll walk again.”

He had to learn to speak again when he woke from his coma and has been left with co-ordination problems similar to those associated with stroke sufferers.

In June, thousands lined the streets of Doncaster to cheer on the injured soldier when he carried the Olympic Torch through his home town ahead of the Olympic Games.