Archaeologist digs honour for research

Site director Dr Clive Waddington showing a piece of pottery to Joan Ward  head of Fund raising at the Farm where Archaeologists and volunteers  have been digging at Sheffield's Whirlow Hall Farm over the past three weeks and their excavations have unearthed a Roman period farmstead of some importance. Set within a large rectangular ditched enclosure measuring about 70m square, the farmstead has produced a wide range of Roman pottery from the various archaeological layers, some of which has come from as far away as Gaul (modern France). Initial inspection of the pottery suggests the site dates to the second century AD - the time of the Roman emperor's Hadrian and Antoninus Pius.  . See Story Martin Slack  Picture by CHRIS LAWTON'04 August 2011
Site director Dr Clive Waddington showing a piece of pottery to Joan Ward head of Fund raising at the Farm where Archaeologists and volunteers have been digging at Sheffield's Whirlow Hall Farm over the past three weeks and their excavations have unearthed a Roman period farmstead of some importance. Set within a large rectangular ditched enclosure measuring about 70m square, the farmstead has produced a wide range of Roman pottery from the various archaeological layers, some of which has come from as far away as Gaul (modern France). Initial inspection of the pottery suggests the site dates to the second century AD - the time of the Roman emperor's Hadrian and Antoninus Pius. . See Story Martin Slack Picture by CHRIS LAWTON'04 August 2011
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AN ARCHAEOLOGIST from Sheffield has won a prestigious award for his firm’s investigation of an Iron Age hill fort in the Peak District.

The research excavation of the year award was presented to Dr Clive Waddington, of Bakewell-based Archaeological Research Services, after the project at Fin Cop revealed unexpected evidence of a massacre of women and children more than 2,000 years ago.

Dr Waddington, from Totley, was presented with the award at the Archaeology Live 2012 conference by TV personality Julian Richards.

The project involved hundreds of schoolchildren and adult volunteers who took part in practical work over two years, followed by extensive laboratory analysis and research.

Dr Waddington said: “We are delighted to win this award.

“I feel honoured, particularly because this was a community project.

“The award highlights that great research can be carried out with the help of local communities.”

The Current Archaeology awards take place every year and are voted for by readers of Current Archaeology magazine.

The Heritage Lottery-funded community excavation rose to national importance when the skeletal remains of several Iron Age women and children were found in a ditch with the ramparts pushed over them as the fort was systematically destroyed.

The Fin Cop excavation, which also won a British archaeology award for best community project in 2010, was supported by the Peak District National Park Authority and English Heritage.