SLIDESHOW: Thousands trot along to Derbyshire show

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Beautiful beasts, sensational sheep and perfect pups are just some of the agricultural attractions drawing people to this year’s Bakewell Show.

The popular two-day event is in full swing on Bakewell’s Wye Valley Showground with crowds flocking from near and far to soak up the atmosphere of the historic event.

Tina and Mark Cooper of Just Plants getting their stand ready

Tina and Mark Cooper of Just Plants getting their stand ready

Originally staged in 1819, the show is now 195 years old and has grown from a relatively small affair to one of the biggest shows of its kind in the country.

Some 65,000 visitors are expected to pass through its gates today and tomorrow to witness classic agricultural displays as well as more diverse forms of entertainment.

Those stepping on to the showground today will be treated to a host of animal shows and displays, including spectacular horse show jumping and a working hunter ponies display.

Gruff goats and radiant rabbits will also be in the spotlight.

Tomorrow will be the turn of sheep to step into the show ring for scrutiny by the judges while pigeons and poultry will cause a flap in a variety of competitions.

The show’s famous cattle classes are well underway with judging taking place over both days. This year there are more than 400 cattle from across the country competing in dozens of different competitions including handsome breeds of longhorns, highlands, holsteins, daisy shorthorns and British blues.

Dashing dogs are also being paraded in front of judges during a number of events. The section’s Companion Dog Show will offer traditional pedigree classes as well as novelty classes with prizes being awarded to the cutest puppy, most handsome dog, and the one with the waggiest tail.

A particular highlight at this year’s event is the 25th anniversary of the popular Food and Farming Marquee, which has become a must-see section of the show.

Visitors can see the link between plough and plate brought to life in a number of exciting, educational and eye-catching ways.

There are hundreds of products on show, from pork pie wedding cakes to sculptures modelled from cheese, as well as a host of trade stalls selling fresh local produce for visitors to take away.

For the first time ever the section will also include demonstrations with local chefs, giving keen cooks the opportunity to pick up some top culinary tips.

Elsewhere on the showground visitors are enjoying horticultural shows, craft demonstrations, fairground rides, motorcycle stunt shows and vintage farm machinery and classic car displays.

A fabulous flock of rather unusual sheep is also catching visitors’ attention.

The flock forms part of the show’s competition titled ‘Show Us Yer Sheep’ which challenged local schoolchildren, families and companies to make their own life-size sheep using a variety of materials.

The baa-my entries are gathered in a pen ready for judging during the two days.