Take Two: Prince Albert, An Apology

editorial image
0
Have your say

PRINCE ALBERT, AN APOLOGY

Now, as alibis go, this seems like a pretty solid one.

This page last week said that some historians believed Prince Albert, the husband of Queen Victoria, was Jack The Ripper.

“Seems highly unlikely,” muses reader Ron Clayton over email. “He died in 1861 – 27 years before the slayings took place.”

Fair play. We’ll let him off the hook. In actual fact, it should have read Prince Albert, grandson of Queen Victoria.

PRINCE ALBERT, A LET OFF

Good job he’s not alive. One imagines wrongly accusing someone of being a five-time serial killer would be somewhat frowned on by the libel courts.

A POPULAR PLANT

And talking of the Victorian period, it’s exactly 120 years today since one of the rarest and most remarkable plants ever seen in Sheffield was unveiled at the Botanical Gardens.

The giant birthwort – native to the Caribbean – had a stem 20 feet tall with 19 inch long blooms. Hundreds of thousands of people visited to look at the giant after it arrived here from the Royal Gardens of Kew in 1893.

NO OIL IN ABBEYDALE

And staying in the 19th century, what a bloke Samuel Doncaster was.

This is the Sheffield steel magnate who, as revealed in The Star last week, travelled across the width of America in 1895.

“I would rather have a quarter of an acre at my house in Abbeydale than a million acres of these that are flying past us right now,” he wrote from his train.

Lovely sentiment but surely not, old chap. There might have been oil under them there hills.