Doncaster gardening geek pushing hard to have greatest lawn on turf

editorial image
0
Have your say

Green fingered OAP spends 30 hours a week hours a week mowing lawn grass by hand.

A self-confessed gardening geek is hoping to send his rivals green with envy – by winning a contest to find Britain’s best lawn.

Stuart Grindle, puts finishing touches to his pirze winning garden before opening gates to the public, pictured at St Mary's Tickhill Heritage Appeal Open Garden event: Picture Michael Ford

Stuart Grindle, puts finishing touches to his pirze winning garden before opening gates to the public, pictured at St Mary's Tickhill Heritage Appeal Open Garden event: Picture Michael Ford

Stuart Grindle, aged 71, will find out if the grass really is greener after his pride and joy garden was named in the final three in the nationwide contest.

The gardening nut from Tickhill spends an incredible 30 hours a week tending to his lawn – cutting it twice a day, three days a week, to keep it at exactly 5mm in length.

Now the public are being given the chance to have their say and vote for Stuart’s carefully cultivated creation in the contest organised by petrol-powered equipment manufacturer Briggs and Stratton.

But garden lovers can only admire his creation from afar – as even his nearest and dearest are discouraged from trampling on the treasured turf.

The retired joiner of Doncaster Road reckons he has spent 40,000 hours over 30 years creating his garden paradise in Tickhill.

He said: “The lawn is my pride and joy. Most people probably only get the lawnmower out once a week but I cut my lawn twice a day three times a week.

“People think it’s astroturf because it’s cut to exactly 5mm long and is in such good condition. That’s down to watering it, and cutting it often. I suppose I am a bit of a gardening geek.”

And woe betide anyone – like Stuart’s son Jonathan, now 41 – who thinks lawns are for rolling or running on.

Wife Anne said: “Stuart is obsessed with the garden but at least he lets me walk on it.

“When Jonathan was a boy he was banned from playing on it – he was sent to play football and cricket on pitches nearby. It’s a wonder he doesn’t have a phobia about grass and the colour green.”

Stuart’s lawnmower is a hand-pushed 14-blade 1947 Ransome Certes that was formerly used by a groundsman at a bowling green.

Each year Briggs and Stratton launches a search to find Britain’s Best Lawn with the public having the final say on their favourite.

To vote, search for Britain’s Best Lawn on Facebook and ‘like’ your favourite entry. Voting is open until November 13 at Britains Best Lawn click link

The prize includes a brand new mower and a day’s services from lawn expert Martin Fish as well as other gardening goodies.

Making life easier for us all since 1827

For many it is a much-loathed chore, but cutting the grass was made easier for the first time more than 180 years ago.

Edwin Budding invented the first lawnmower in 1827 in Thrupp, just outside Stroud, Gloucestershire.

The mower was designed primarily to cut the grass on sports grounds and extensive gardens as a superior alternative to the scythe.

19 inches wide with a frame made of wrought iron, the mower was pushed from behind and cast iron gear wheels transmitted power from the rear roller to the cutting cylinder, allowing the rear roller to drive the knives on the cutting cylinder while the grass clippings were hurled forward into a tray-like box.

Overall however, Budding’s basic design has changed little over the years although, of course, many mowers are now electric or petrol-driven rather than being pushed and operated by hand.