Show for favourite city painter

Sheffield central library exhibition of work by Yorkshire landscape artist Stanley Royle. curatorial services manager Sian Brown.
Sheffield central library exhibition of work by Yorkshire landscape artist Stanley Royle. curatorial services manager Sian Brown.
0
Have your say

The work of one of Sheffield’s much-loved artists, Stanley Royle, is being celebrated at a special exhibition at the city’s Graves Gallery.

The artist became popular for his beautiful landscape paintings, many showing the countryside around Sheffield and the Peak District.

Curatorial services manager Sian Brown has put together the exhibition, spanning Royle’s career from the early part of the 20th century right up to 1960, the year he died.

He was born in Stalybridge, greater Manchester, but the family moved to Ecclesfield when he was a young boy.

He studied at Sheffield School of Art and went to work as an illustrator and designer for Sheffield newspapers. In 1913 he had three works accepted by the Royal Academy.

Sian said: “He is always thought of as a Sheffield artist. We’ve adopted him as one of ours.”

Royle moved to Canada with his family to escape the Great Depression in 1931 but came back to Sheffield in 1945.

He often rode out to the Peak District on a motorbike with a canvas and his paints strapped to the bike.

Museums Sheffield has the biggest collection of his works. Around 40 are on display.

A picture on loan from a private collector in Leicestershire is one of a quartet of large paintings that Stanley Royle produced in 1922, showing Crookes, the Mayfield Valley, the Park or Norfolk Park area and Wincobank.

Three are in the city collection but it’s the first time all have been shown together.

Sian said that Stanley Royle was also very aware that Sheffield’s industrial might was changing the city’s landscape.

One example is the 1920 picture Morning on the Derbyshire Moors that features a young girl wearing an old-fashioned bonnet and dress.

It has been on show in the Graves for many years and is a big favourite with visitors.

Sian said: “He was interested in capturing the city and countryside, which was changing rapidly just after World War One with dramatic industrialisation.

“He presents quite a nostalgic view.”

One of Stanley Royle’s granddaughters, Lucy Coplestone, has written about her grandfather and his work to coincide with the show, which runs at the gallery in the Central Library on Surrey Street until May 30.

Go online at http://www.stanleyroyle.com/blog/