Pupils quick on the draw to create ‘toon images

Children's book illustrator Liz Million with Edenthorpe  Hungerhill School pupils, from left, Robert Marley, Lavada Storey, Alex Bray Brandon O'Hara, Charlotte Temperton and Charley Casey.
Children's book illustrator Liz Million with Edenthorpe Hungerhill School pupils, from left, Robert Marley, Lavada Storey, Alex Bray Brandon O'Hara, Charlotte Temperton and Charley Casey.
0
Have your say

YOUNGSTErS at a Doncaster school are looking picture perfect!

Pupils from year 10 at Hungerhill School, and a number of its feeder schools, turned their hand to creating their own cartoon characters when the received a visit from a well-known children’s book author and illustrator.

Liz Million, who has published a series of youngsters books, spent a day with pupils, handing them tips for how to draw characters.

And the 35-year-old creator of such characters as Little Fred Riding Hood and the Not So Silly Sausage was impressed by the efforts of the children taking part.

She said: “The kids were really enthusiastic and they all managed to produce some fantastic characters for an imaginary comic book. There were some great characters such as goofy teachers and nerdy children.

“It is always a pleasure to come to Doncaster, and it is always a warm welcome, and it is great to get out of my studio and meet the children.”

Liz was invited to the school by librarian Angela Waugh, who was there to see the session and the writer at work.

She said Liz had handed the youngsters a lot of tips and taught them a lot of new skills before they went on to create their own pictures.

After working with primary school pupils in the morning, she went on to help a group of CGSE graphics pupils - many of whom said they were interested in following in Liz’s footsteps to become writers and illustrators.

Some of their work from the sessions will be included in their GCSE portfolios.

Mrs Waugh said: “It was the first time we had invited the primary schools to something like this, and it was great to work with them.

“I even had a go at the cartoons myself, although I had never really been very good at drawing.

“I created a lion, but I’m afraid it wasn’t as good as the pictures the pupils came up with.”