Worst road in UK for worn-out markings

FLOOD AT ECCLESFIELD  Traffic negotiating the wet conditions at Ecclesfield Road, Sheffield.    1 October 2010
FLOOD AT ECCLESFIELD Traffic negotiating the wet conditions at Ecclesfield Road, Sheffield. 1 October 2010
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A SOUTH Yorkshire road has been ranked the worst in the country for the its dangerously worn-out white markings.

The A6135, between Ecclesfield, in Sheffield and junction 36 of the M1 at Barnsley, features in a new report released by the Road Safety Marking Association.

It found that on a five-mile stretch just one per cent of the road markings were in good condition.

On the five-mile section of the A6135, three-quarters of the markings were either barely visible or needed an immediate schedule for replacement.

Sheffield Council head of streetscene Nick Hetherington said: “We are aware of the issues around the road markings on the A6135 and plans were put in hand last year to improve the situation.

“A major road maintenance scheme is currently on site in Ecclesfield around the Morrisons supermarket and the section between Chapeltown and the city boundary has already been repainted.

“Similarly, a section to the south of the Chapeltown roundabout is being refreshed as part of a wider scheme.

“Additional sections of the A6135 are due to be refreshed within the next few months between Cumberland Crescent and Church Street, and Station Road to Green Lane.”

Checks across the UK found 14 per cent of road markings were completely worn out and a further 15 per cent needed replacing immediately on more than 60 single-carriageway A-roads.

Just 29 per cent of white lines reached the acceptable level of visibility, the report said.

Of the 470 miles of major A-roads and motorways, 20 per cent fell below the minimum standard and needed replacing, while eight per cent had centre line markings so worn they were barely visible.

RSMA national director George Lee said: “Two years ago, just two per cent of our major road network had markings that rated virtually non-existent. This figure has risen at an alarming rate and now nearly a tenth of the centre lines on our trade routes are dangerously worn.”