Union demo and march to mark Doncaster Tesco dispute

Eddie Stobbart lorry drivers continue their strike outside the Tesco Depot on Middle Bank, with an armoured personel vehicle. Pictured back l-r are Darren Sanderson, of Conisbrough, Eddie Donoghue, of Barnsley. Middle l-r John Smith, of Doncaster, Graham Ward, of Armthorpe, Tony Lewis, of Doncaster, Dave Northmore, of Edenthorpe, army vehicle owner Robert Allen, of Kirk Sandall, and Dave Reeves, of Sheffield. Pictured front is John Wilson, of Doncaster.  Picture: Liz Mockler D2700LM
Eddie Stobbart lorry drivers continue their strike outside the Tesco Depot on Middle Bank, with an armoured personel vehicle. Pictured back l-r are Darren Sanderson, of Conisbrough, Eddie Donoghue, of Barnsley. Middle l-r John Smith, of Doncaster, Graham Ward, of Armthorpe, Tony Lewis, of Doncaster, Dave Northmore, of Edenthorpe, army vehicle owner Robert Allen, of Kirk Sandall, and Dave Reeves, of Sheffield. Pictured front is John Wilson, of Doncaster. Picture: Liz Mockler D2700LM
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A demonstration to mark one year on from a bitter industrial dispute will be held in Doncaster next weekend.

Union officials will march past the Tesco distribtion depot off White Rose Way on November 16, the scene of a long-running strike and demonstations last year.

The demo, organised by the Unite union, aims to highlight how bosses are exploiting workers when they are transferred to another employer.

Doncaster has been chosen because it was the centre of a bitter dispute last winter when 183 Unite drivers were transferred from Tesco to Eddie Stobart Ltd under The Transfer of Undertakings and Protection of Employment (TUPE) regulations.

Unite argues that the government is intent on watering down even further the TUPE regulations which are designed to protect the pay, and terms and conditions when workers are transferred to a new organisation.

The union will be marshalling members and activists at Doncaster Rovers’ Keepmoat Stadium at 11am for a march past the gates of the epot and through the town before returning to the football ground for a rally.

Unite national officer Adrian Jones said: “The TUPE regulations were introduced to give some protection and security to workers who are directly affected by employers choosing to outsource work to a contractor.

“While Unite has worked for years within the law, it seems more and more employers are now exploiting the legislation to their advantage - and the disadvantage of our members.

“Meanwhile, the government is looking to change the regulations to give employers even more freedom to change terms and conditions, and put jobs at risk.

“More and more employers are exploiting the legislation to their advantage.”