Online buses help to decide suitability

All aboard: A Shade Greener's managing director Stewart Davies, left and technical director John Wade with one of the former mobile libraries that the company has converted into an internet centre.
All aboard: A Shade Greener's managing director Stewart Davies, left and technical director John Wade with one of the former mobile libraries that the company has converted into an internet centre.
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Stewart Davies has been involved in a number of businesses over the years, but, when it comes to his latest enterprise, he is unequivocal.

“It’s the most exciting project I have ever been involved with,” he says.

“It’s the first really green tax. People who don’t participate are going to pay for it”

A Shade Greener is installing around 15 systems every day and says it is barely scratching the surface when it comes to the potential Britain has for using solar power.

The company has faced some criticism because applications can only be made over the internet but it has attempted to answer that by acquiring two former mobile library buses, equipping them with internet connections and touring the region so that people can find out whether their house might be suitable for an installation.

“We have done everything we can to get to the people,” says Stewart Davies.

Unfortunately, not all homes are suitable for an installation. They may not face in the right direction, the roof may not be in a good enough condition or the applicant may not actually own the house.

“We get a lot of applications from council house tenants who are completely miffed when we have to turn them down,” says Stewart Davies, whose company reckons to have a further 10,000 systems to give away.