Make the most of AMRC skills

Leading speakers and guests at the AMRC Training Centre Business Launch, including Hamid Mughal from Rolls-Royce, second left, Local Growth Minister Kris Hopkins and the Mayor of Rotherham Coun John Foden, sixth and seventh from the right and Alison Bettac, second from the right.
Leading speakers and guests at the AMRC Training Centre Business Launch, including Hamid Mughal from Rolls-Royce, second left, Local Growth Minister Kris Hopkins and the Mayor of Rotherham Coun John Foden, sixth and seventh from the right and Alison Bettac, second from the right.
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Businesses from across the Sheffield City Region have been urged to take maximum advantage of the AMRC’s new Training Centre to ensure their current and future employees have the advanced manufacturing skills they need for success.

And the signs are they won’t need a second invitation from AMRC Training Centre director of training Alison Bettac.

Well over 200 business leaders from across the region and from industry giants such as Rolls-Royce and Boeing filled the new training centre’s main hall for its launch to the business community.

The centre has already had to increase its first year capacity to cope with demand and is seeking to increase numbers to 250 apprentices in the coming year, but its ambitions don’t stop there.

Demand is such that developments of further plots of land, one to the side and the other to the rear of the centre, could be brought forward.

Meanwhile, the centre is rapidly expanding its training offering.

While its core business is providing advanced apprenticeships, it is adding higher apprenticeships, leading to qualifications at graduate level, practical training for graduates and preparing to launch Industrial Doctorates in subjects like advanced machining.

The centre is also moving into continual professional development, creating courses that could lead to MBAs and part time degrees, as well as courses in business administration and technical sales, including language training, tailored to manufacturing.

Developments include training for the polymers, forgings and food engineering sectors, leadership and apprentice mentoring – aimed at companies that may not have recruited apprentices for many years and whose staff may not have the mentoring skills that were once second nature.

The centre is also intent on ensuring its programmes allow trainees at any level to progress easily all the way to a first degree and beyond.

“We are very keen to establish a progression route for every single pathway into higher education,” Alison Bettac told attendees at the business launch.

“We believe we have created an easier transition from foundation degree to undergraduate degree and we are not sure that has been done anywhere else.”