Housing prices ‘among lowest’

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CENTRAL Doncaster has been labelled one of the lowest cost areas for housing in the country in a survey.

The DN1 postcode area, which the town centre and areas such as Hyde park, parts of Wheatley, parts of Hexthorpe and St James flats was ranked as the 11th cheapest in the survey by the property webside Zoopla, with an average figure of £74,005.

But the low ranking has surprised Doncaster property expert Stuart Highfield, who defended the area.

Mr Highfield, who rents out around 600 properties through his company Highfields Property Management, said: “DN1 has some really nice houses in it. You are talking about some beautiful houses around Thorne Road and Bass Terrace.

“It really does surprise me to see it rated as one of the cheapest areas. I assume they must be talking about the private sector, and areas like the St James flats are council owned.

“I certain wouldn’t compare it to places like Pitsmoor in Sheffield, which was also ranked among the lowest, and it is not a difficult area to rent properties out.”

He said the Hyde Park area was set to benefit from housing modernisation schemes, such as the Six Street scheme.

He said the figures showed there were bargains available on the market at present.

The lowest prices in South Yorkshire were in the S4 area of Sheffield, which includes Pitsmoor, where average values were £68,602.

The S14 area was also cheaper than central Doncaster, with houses valued at £70,112 on average.

Nick Leeming, business development director at Zoopla.co.uk, said: “Despite the property market uncertainty, Brits remain obsessed with the value of their home as well as those of their neighbours, friends and family. This year’s Property Rich List shows an ever-widening North-South divide and, whilst house prices in some of the most expensive areas of the country have fallen a little over the past 12 months, they have held up far better than in many of the less expensive areas.”

Nationally, 5,922 streets have average prices over £1 million.