Games players gain top marks

Pupils at Yardleys School pupil Chandar Jaipal (14) and Deputy Headteacher David Pohl with one of Doncaster-based I-education's e-learning systems, which allows users to play a computer game after successfully completing revision.
Pupils at Yardleys School pupil Chandar Jaipal (14) and Deputy Headteacher David Pohl with one of Doncaster-based I-education's e-learning systems, which allows users to play a computer game after successfully completing revision.
0
Have your say

Computer games developed in Doncaster are helping pupils to achieve top marks in basic subjects, according to research carried out at a leading secondary school in Birmingham.

The games are linked to e-learning revision programmes and are created by educational content development and consultancy I-education, which is based at Success Doncaster’s D-HUB creative and digital businesses incubator.

Around 900 primary and secondary school pupils across the UK currently use the company’s I Am Learning interactive games based revision programme, which can be accessed using school and home computers or even smartphones.

Pupils only get to play the game after successfully completing a revision module and, in some case, the better their results in the revision section, the greater the powers they can access in the game.

“If we create something they want to do and are interested in, half the battle is won and results will go up,” says I-education director Steve Holt.

“Students think they are playing games but they’re actually improving their results.”

The 33-year-old’s claim is backed up by research by Yardleys School, a top state secondary in Birmingham.

The school compared results of pupils who did and didn’t use the I Am Learning system and found that 70 per cent of regular users exceeded pre-set GCSE targets in maths compared with just 40 per cent of other pupils.

Teachers can use the system to set homework and track progress.

They said the system promoted ‘stealth learning’ with children unwittingly picking up key skills while being engrossed in computer games, and created healthy competition between pupils who sought to achieve higher scores and climb school leader boards.