Demolition of Sheffield cottage would lead to 'carbuncle' modern home

How the modern new home could look if Bennett Cottage is demolished. Photo: Bramhall Blenkarn
How the modern new home could look if Bennett Cottage is demolished. Photo: Bramhall Blenkarn
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Scores of people have objected to plans to replace a traditional cottage on Sheffield’s outskirts with a modern new home – but plenty of others say they support the proposal.

Robert Rusling has applied to demolish Bennett Cottage in Mayfield Road.

An artist's impression of the new house. Photo Bramhall Blenkarn

An artist's impression of the new house. Photo Bramhall Blenkarn

The building, in the Mayfield Valley, has been added to extensively’ over time, according to a report from agent Bramhall Blenkharn, and ‘lacks cohesion’ inside.

Mr Rusling – a director of building firm Ackroyd and Abbott Ltd – hopes to build a four-bedroom home that would make the most of the change in levels by putting the garage and amenity area below the living space, with a lift between the two.

The new house would have a modern look and would be energy efficient.

The application says the house is ‘contemporary in nature’ but also a ‘contextual response to the site’.

Bennett Cottage today. Photo Bramhall Blenkarn

Bennett Cottage today. Photo Bramhall Blenkarn

It adds: “The proposal does not impact on any neighbouring properties or public footpaths which are all relatively distant from the house.

“It is felt that the new house provides a dramatic, yet considerate response to both brief and site, creating a house worthy of its setting overlooking the Mayfield Valley.”

At least 30 people have written to Sheffield Council in support of the proposals. Andrew Lawson, of Whiteley Wood Road, said he ‘couldn’t believe’ how many nimbys lived nearby, adding: “This development is innovative to say the least and will blend into its surroundings almost immediately.”

But a even more have objected to the plans. David Anson, of School Green Lane, said the home was ‘totally at odds’ with other buildings nearby.

He also feared for the future of trees around the house.

“Completion of the building will be the death sentence for the trees and the appearance of a carbuncle for all to see within the valley,” he added.

Nick Roscoe, of Hallamshire Historic Buildings, said Bennett Cottage was about 300 years old and included a medieval ‘cruck’ barn alongside, which would be demolished under the plans. The wooden cruck has apparently been removed.

Mr Roscoe said: “The proposed design would fit in an urban area but would harm the character of Mayfield.

“The application states the design is ‘dramatic and contemporary’, but would be well screened and low profile. In fact the site is already clearly visible from a number of roads in the area, and once a few trees have been cut down, will be more visible.”

Mr Rusling could not be reached for comment.