Cutting costs for Yorkshire

VO4HOME's business development manager, Geoff Clifton, with the company's voltage optimisation equipment
VO4HOME's business development manager, Geoff Clifton, with the company's voltage optimisation equipment
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A SOUTH Yorkshire firm that has developed revolutionary energy saving technology is joining forces with a not-for-profit business support consultancy to help firms across Yorkshire cut their energy costs and carbon emissions.

A SOUTH Yorkshire firm that has developed revolutionary energy saving technology is joining forces with a not-for-profit business support consultancy to help firms across Yorkshire cut their energy costs and carbon emissions.

Rotherham-based VO4HOME has teamed up with Leeds-based CO2Sense to identify small and medium-sized firms that could benefit from technology developed by VO4HOME’s parent group, EMSc, that stops power being wasted.

The initiative, launched on Yorkshire Day, centres on EMSc’s “voltage optimisation” technology, which was originally developed for factories and large organisations with significant power requirements.

The Templeborough company has also developed an off the shelf version of its innovation, which can cut domestic electricity consumption by more than 10 per cent and it is this technology that VO4HOME and CO2 Sense reckon could benefit smaller firms, as well as social and private landlords.

CO2Sense has invested in a number of VO4HOME units and both organisations are working to identify sites that would get maximum benefit from an installation.

Projects will also be monitored and used as case studies to demonstrate what CO2 and financial savings can be achieved by utilising the technology.

“This is an exciting project that will provide tangible cost benefits for those involved in the project, whilst simultaneously lowering their carbon footprint. It’s very much a win-win situation for the customer,” said VO4HOME’s business development manager, Geoff Clifton.

A social housing project has already been identified as a test site and both companies are now looking for other test sites involving small and medium sized enterprises and university accommodation.

Voltage optimisation works by matching the supply voltage to the voltage required by the equipment the electricity is being used to power.

The average voltage supplied by the National Grid can be 20 to 30 volts above the 220 volts most equipment is designed to run on. Excess power is turned into heat, shortening the life of the equipment it is powering.

Tests show the life of light bulbs is halved if the voltage is 10 per cent higher than 220 volts and the lifespan of other equipment is also reduced.

Companies interested in participating in the free trial should contact either Geoff Clifton of VO4HOME tel: 07769 212051 or Jeanine Willoughby of CO2Sense, tel: 0113 237 8452.