Buses to drive up standards for blind

Stagecoach bus drivers learn awareness of blind passengers and blind people learn about bus drivers issues at the Stagecoach depot
Stagecoach bus drivers learn awareness of blind passengers and blind people learn about bus drivers issues at the Stagecoach depot
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Bus drivers in South Yorkshire showed they will never turn a blind eye to passengers in need of support.

Staff from Stagecoach and First learned about the difficulties people with visual impairment face when using public transport.

Stagecoach bus drivers learn awareness of blind passengers and blind people learn about bus drivers issues at the Stagecoach depot

Stagecoach bus drivers learn awareness of blind passengers and blind people learn about bus drivers issues at the Stagecoach depot

The drivers donned glasses for an exercise at depots in Holbrook and Olive Grove as part of a campaign organised by the regional branch of the Royal National Institute of Blind People.

Charity bosses invited drivers to take part in the role reversal after a survey found nine out of 10 people with sight loss cannot see a nearing bus in time to hail it.

Tracy Dearing, RNIB campaigns officer for Yorkshire and Humber, said: “Catching a bus should not be a sight test. Bus travel is a lifeline, providing an important means of transport for those who are not able to drive, however, the difficulties blind and partially sighted people face in making journeys are unacceptable and often unnecessary.

“We want operators to remember one simple principle: stop for me, speak to me.”

Sue Hayes, of Stagecoach Yorkshire, said: “Accessibility is a key priority for us and we want to build on this further by gaining a better understanding of the challenges blind and partially sighted people face using our buses.”

Ben Gillian, for First South Yorkshire, said “We’re keen to help build the confidence of these customers.”

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