Bloodhound scents victory with Newburgh

Top gear: Newburgh Engineering apprentice Luke Thickett, left and Bloodhound's James Painter with the gearbox casing for the 1,000mph supercar.

Top gear: Newburgh Engineering apprentice Luke Thickett, left and Bloodhound's James Painter with the gearbox casing for the 1,000mph supercar.

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A BRITISH bid to set a new land speed record in excess of 1,000 miles an hour is stepping up a gear with the help of Newburgh Engineering.

The Rotherham-based advanced manufacturing firm chose the recent Autosport Show in Birmingham as the ideal occasion to present gearbox casings for the Bloodhound Super Sonic Car to the team behind the project.

Newburgh apprentice Luke Thickett, aged 18, who has been working on the gearbox casing for the supercar’s auxiliary power unit, apprentice manager Andy Millward and works manager Nick Andrew handed over the parts to Bloodhound’s James Painter.

Andy Millward said: “We are delighted to have been asked to present our contribution to this internationally recognised project at Autosport 2012.

“Bloodhound is an exciting project, and we are honoured to be a part of history in the making. The event was also a fantastic reminder that British manufacturing is among the best in the world.”

Bloodhound is the brainchild of entrepreneur Richard Noble, who brought the land speed record back to Britain in 1983 and capped that success by leading the team that designed Thrust SSC – the first car to go faster than the speed of sound.

Around half of the power for Bloodhound comes from a Eurojet EJ200 engine, normally found in a Eurofighter Typhoon. The rest comes from a rocket.

Components supplied by Newburgh took 12 weeks to make and had to be manufactured to the highest precision and quality standards as the gearbox is a critical part of the auxilliary power unit.

The unit – an 800bhp Formula 1 engine – has to start the jet engine and pump a ton of liquid fuel to the rocket at more than 80 times atmospheric pressure in less than 25 seconds.

In addition to increasing the land speed record by almost a third to in excess of 1,000mph, the Bloodhound SSC project team hopes to encourage young people to take up engineering, science and technology-based careers.

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