Beatson invests in glass recycling

From left: Chris Daniells, recycling plant engineer, Colin Saysell, logistics manager and Dave Linford, health and safety manager
From left: Chris Daniells, recycling plant engineer, Colin Saysell, logistics manager and Dave Linford, health and safety manager
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Rotherham glass manufacturer Beatson Clark has proved recycling can be lucrative too after spending £840,000 on a new plant.

The company, which makes glass bottles and jars for the food, drink and pharmaceutical sectors, also holds the contract to manage Rotherham’s recycling collections.

Its recycling plant on Greasborough Road receives 6,240 tonnes of material from the council every year, of which 4,734 tonnes is glass.

The firm installed an automated recycling system in October which makes processing waste glass for its furnaces much faster. It can handle six tonnes of material an hour – almost double the amount it could process previously.

Manual sorting has been replaced by an machine which uses light and cameras to detect glass of different colours and identify ceramics, stones and porcelain which can cause defects in the glass and damage the furnace.

Meanwhile, a magnet pulls out metals and a baler automatically bundles up metals.

Colin Saysell, supply chain manager, said: “Sourcing the right quantity of glass waste can be difficult at times so our new, improved recycling plant will help to prevent us running short,” he said.

“Residents can help us by only putting glass bottles and jars, metal cans and lids, and textiles and footwear in the blue box. They should not put Pyrex or pottery in as this won’t melt in our furnaces and can even cause damage and rejected bottles, wasting both glass and energy.

“The improvements will also help us to reduce our carbon footprint as the recycled material only has to travel a few metres from the plant to the furnace rather than being brought in from a recycling processor several miles away.”

All the glass recycled at Beatson Clark is used to make new bottles and jars, while the textiles, steel and aluminium are sent on to other recycling companies, he added.

Last year, the firm has spent millions on two new furnaces and inspection and bottle-making equipment.