Architectural firm enjoys good start

Architect David Cross from Coda Studios with Robert White in the award winning extension at Rob Royd Farm Shop in Worsborough, Barnsley.
Architect David Cross from Coda Studios with Robert White in the award winning extension at Rob Royd Farm Shop in Worsborough, Barnsley.
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Coda Studios, the award-winning Sheffield architectural design company, says it has made the best start to the year since the recession caused the building slump in 2008.

The Mowbray Street company, which recently picked up The South Yorkshire and Humber LABC Building Excellence Award for its designs for the Rob Royd Farm Shop in Worsborough, says turnover was 30 per cent up in the first quarter of the year, compared with the same period last year.

Rob Royd Farm Shop in Worsborough, Barnsley.

Rob Royd Farm Shop in Worsborough, Barnsley.

Managing director David Cross says the figures shows there is finally renewed faith in the building industry after four years of uncertainty.

“This is our best start to the year since 2008. This is just the first quarter of the year but we are already confident that the growth we are witnessing right now will continue throughout the rest of 2012 and take us into 2013 with even greater confidence,” says Mr Cross.

Coda is currently working on four major building projects worth a total of almost £6 million at sites in Ranmoor, West Street, Rockingham Street and Cross Bedford Street.

It is also working on historic sites like the former Middlewood Hospital Chapel and the Loxley Works area.

“The great range and variety of work we are undertaking at the moment demonstrates clearly that there is a new confidence in the future of imaginative building projects,” says Mr Cross.

“Right now we have enquiries for new housing projects in Sheffield, Barnsley, Dronfield and Huddersfield and we are very proud to be working on a multi-million pound project at Sandbanks in Dorset, the country’s most valuable real estate area.”

David Cross says the company was involved in the construction of around 900 new homes from 2003 to 2007, but that number fell to just 100 in the following four years.

That means there is now a massive shortfall in available housing and people are wanting to invest again. Meanwhile, banks are starting to look more favourably on borrowers and the construction industry is now getting a much needed boost as a result.

“While many people might think the headlines are still dominated by recession, we really have started to get the connections and see some real change,” says Mr Cross.

“The demand is there again, banking confidence is returning and we are prepared to meet the challenge of a new market.”