£1.5m titanium aero parts project

Metalysis scientist Nader Khan,  with the  revolutionary plant at the company's headquarters in Wath upon Dearne
Metalysis scientist Nader Khan, with the revolutionary plant at the company's headquarters in Wath upon Dearne
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A pioneering South Yorkshire titanium specialist is part of a £1.5m project to create new aerospace components using 3D printing.

Metalysis, based in Wath-upon-Dearne, will increase production of its high-quality low-cost titanium powder for the programme, which aims to develop the UK’s skills in the sector.

Chief executive Dion Vaughan said titanium - which is light, strong, corrosion and heat resistant - could eventually replace aluminium and steel in many products.

He added: “This project will demonstrate its potential in the additive layer manufacturing (3D printing) of metal components, bringing down the cost of production, manufacturing and increasing environmental performance of aerospace and beyond.”

Metalysis, a spin-out from Sheffield University, was set up to commercialise a process developed to replace the highly inefficient, slow and chemically hazardous processes used for the last 70 years.

The Aerospace Technology Institute will invest £1.5m in a project, led by GKN Aerospace, with partners including Phoenix Scientific Industries Ltd and The University of Leeds.

3D printing can make parts lighter and reduces waste.

Russ Dunn, ATI senior vice president engineering and technology, said: “To date research into AM has focused largely on evolving the processes we will require to enter full scale production but if these processes are, to make a significant breakthrough, the quality, repeatability and cost of the material we use will be critical.

“We will begin the process of addressing this issue with our industrial partners.”